What Do You Want Your Students To Love?

Prioritize Your List

“What if education wasn’t first and foremost about what we know, but about what we love?” James K.A. SmithBasic RGB

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It’s August and the first days of school are upon us!  It’s time to plan lessons and prepare schedules.  It’s time to craft tests and make lists of topics we want to cover. It’s time to get out the curriculum guide and review all that we need to teach our students this year.

It’s also time to pause:  pause to reflect on what it is we are really doing.  It’s time to ask ourselves the question posed by James K.A. Smith:  “What if education wasn’t first and foremost about what we know, but about what we love?”

What if . . .

. . . loving virtue were more important than memorizing facts?

. . . loving others were more important than excelling at a sport?

. . . loving beauty were more important than finishing everything?

. . . loving truth were more important than being right?

. . . loving learning were more important than making a good grade?

. . . loving God were more important than getting into a good college?

What if?

Would we still have our students memorize facts?  Of course.  Push them to excel?  Absolutely?  Encourage them to finish well?  Think rightly?  Make good grades?  Pursue college? Yes. Yes. Yes. And yes.

But, I wonder, what would happen if we started our yearly plans with a list of what we want our students to love and then made our list of what we want them to know?

Would our schedules, plans, lessons look different?  I think so, even for seasoned Christian educators.  I know they do for me.  I am thankful to be able to walk by a large banner of this quote every day in the lobby of my school.  What a poignant reminder that our real purpose is not to fill minds.  Rather, it is to train affections.

How would you answer this “What If?” question?  Share your thoughts in the comments below.

(If you are interested in pondering this topic more, you may enjoy James K. A. Smith’s book Desiring the Kingdom, C.S. Lewis’s Weight of Glory, or Richard Riesen’s Piety and Philosophy).

Marty Reed teaches at Veritas School, a classical Christian school in Richmond, Virginia. Her twenty years of teaching, coupled with her duties as pastor's wife and mother of two, provide her with excellent insights to share with FOCUS readers.

Please note: we reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Dan

    I appreciate the challenge to evaluate our procedures from a different perspective. It’s always healthy to take a second, third, or fifteenth look at why we do what we do, Thank you for this reminder to consider our educational philosophy!

    • Martha Earwood Reed

      For task-oriented people like me (and many other teachers I know), it’s easy to lose sight of the “ends” as we work through all the mundane “means.” I need to be reminded daily!

  • Edward Earwood

    Dan, I am with you. Seems like that fifteenth look often opens my eyes to something that I missed in the first fourteen.