The Beauty of Community

Health Update on Edward

Last month featured a two-part post on Recommitting to a Christian Philosophy and Community.  I was refreshed by several points Dr. Uecker makes; however, this past week, I was reminded in a very tangible way of the importance of the very type of community that this blog seeks to create.

As many of you may know, last week, Edward Earwood, the editor of FOCUS the focus blog, was hospitalized with serious health concerns.  As word of his condition spread within the Christian education community, people around the country and around the world began praying for his healing.  His family have received numerous visits, calls, and expressions of kindness and concern.  On behalf of the family, thank you!

We are pleased that God has seen fit to answer those prayers and that Edward’s health is improving. He’s out of intensive care and looks forward to being released from the hospital in the coming days.  Please pray for his continued healing and rehabilitation.  As those who know him can imagine, he’s eager to return to his work to edify, equip, and engage the Christian education community.

What is the Purpose of Education? Part 2

Today’s post is a continuation from part 1, which you can read here.

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We finished part 1, with this question and answer:

And that brings us to this most foundational question: What is the purpose of education?  Succinctly, we may state that education is the process of inculcating a worldview in the mind of the student.  

What is the Purpose of Education? Part 1

Martin Luther was born in 1483 in Eisleben, Saxony (Germany).  His parents wanted him to become a lawyer but, in the university, he developed a love-hate relationship with Aristotle: he believed faith was the only way to know ultimate truth, but he also believed faith was rational and could be defended with reason and logic.

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Since his love for God was greater than his love of law, he ultimately left jurisprudence and became an Augustinian friar in 1505.  He had, in fact, rejected the possibility of finding truth by means of any of the infinite variations of rationalism: the reasoning of the majority, the reasoning of an elite group, or the reasoning of his own mind.  After all, there are just two choices on the shelf for acquiring absolute truth: rationalism or revelation.  Since all possible varieties of rationalism have differing internal conclusions, none can be trusted.